TDB&TB Tidbit #24 ~ A Day in the Life

by Jean-Dominique Bauby

Moderator: Liz

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

TDB&TB Tidbit #24 ~ A Day in the Life

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Apr 28, 2008 7:54 am

A Day in the Life is the title of the next to last chapter in the book and deals with the day Jean-Do had his stroke.

The original working title of A Day In The Life was "In The Life Of..." The song includes portions originally authored independently by Lennon and McCartney, and two cacophonous, part-improvised, orchestral crescendos. Lennon was inspired by newspaper articles on the death of Tara Browne, and a civic plan to fill four thousand potholes in Blackburn. While recording the song, the Beatles were not certain how to fill the gap between Lennon's and McCartney's portions of the song. It was later decided that a partly-improvised crescendo by an orchestra would serve as the bridge.

The supposed drug reference in the line "I'd love to turn you on" resulted in the banning of the song by the BBC. It appears on many top songs lists, and is the 26th best song on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The song is considered one of the Beatles' most influential, with the final E major chord becoming popularized to the point of being clichéd in modern music. It often appears in lists and polls of the most influential Beatles song and appears as the final track on their album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Since its original album release, the song has also been released on single, on compilation albums, and has been performed by other artists including Jeff Beck and The Bee Gees. The title sequence of every episode of The Simpsons ends slightly differently, these are called "the couch gags" because the Simpson family ends up sitting down on the couch in front of the TV in a different way. However, one special "couch gag" didn't end on a couch at all, instead they all gathered in a recreation of the Sgt. Pepper cover to a sustained chord reminiscent of the end of A Day In The Life.

Image

The verses were written by Lennon while reading the Daily Mail on January 17, 1967. He read in the newspaper about the death of Tara Browne, the 21-year-old heir to the Guinness fortune and friend of The Beatles, who had crashed his Lotus Elan after driving through a red light. Lennon wrote the final verse of the song after reading an article in the Daily Mirror about the substantial amount of potholes in Blackburn, a city in Lancashire. However, he had a problem with the words of the final verse, not being able to think of the word "fill" for the line, "Now they know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall". His friend Terry Doran suggested what the word should be.

The description of the accident in "A Day in the Life" was not a literal description of Browne's fatal accident. Lennon said, "I didn't copy the accident. Tara didn't blow his mind out, but it was in my mind when I was writing that verse. The details of the accident in the song — not noticing traffic lights and a crowd forming at the scene — were similarly part of the fiction."

McCartney provided the middle section of the song, a short piano piece he had been working on independently, with lyrics about a commuter whose uneventful morning routine leads him to drift off into a reverie. He had written the piece as a wistful recollection of his younger years, which included riding the bus to school, smoking and going to class. The line "I'd love to turn you on" was also contributed by McCartney, which serves as a chorus to the first section of the song. McCartney also provided a short, wordless vocal bridge back into Lennon's part of the song. Lennon commented on McCartney's section, saying, "I had the bulk of the song and the words, but he contributed this little lick floating around in his head that he couldn't use for anything. I thought it was a damn good piece of work."

The 24-bar bridge section ended with the sound of an alarm clock triggered by Mal Evans, a Beatles roadie. He set the alarm clock (heard on the recording) to go off at the end of his 24-bar count so everyone would come back in at the same time. The original intent was to edit out the ringing alarm clock when the missing section was filled in; however it complemented McCartney's piece well; the first line of McCartney's song began "Woke up, fell out of bed", so the decision was made to keep the sound. Evans also helped with the composition of a couple of songs on the Sgt. Pepper album. Although he never received composer's credit, the Beatles did pay his estate a lump sum in the 1990s for his contributions.

The orchestral part was recorded on February 10, 1967, with McCartney and Martin conducting a 41 piece orchestra. The recording session was completed at a total cost of 367 pounds for the players, an extravagance at the time. The musicians were told to attend the session dressed formally. When they got there, they were presented with party novelties (false noses, party hats, gorilla-paw glove) to wear, which made it clear this was not going to be a typical session. Martin later described explaining his improvised score to the puzzled orchestra:

“What I did there was to write ... the lowest possible note for each of the instruments in the orchestra. At the end of the twenty-four bars, I wrote the highest note...near a chord of E major. Then I put a squiggly line right through the twenty-four bars, with reference points to tell them roughly what note they should have reached during each bar ... Of course, they all looked at me as though I were completely mad.”

https://backup.filesanywhere.com/v.asp?v=%8Aoj%86%5Fb%9Fwk%AC

The semi-improvised segment was recorded multiple times and eventually four different recordings were overdubbed into a single massive crescendo.

The entire session was filmed. In early 1967 the weekly pop music newspapers regularly reported the Beatles' plan to make a television special about the making of Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It never happened, but the footage shot on this night was to have been the start and it duly captured the craziness of the evening, making for a compelling if chaotic, little film, with all of the musicians in evening dress, everyone - including John Lennon - wearing silly novelties like upside down spectacles, plastic stick-on nipples, imitation bald heads, red noses, false eyes, fake cigars and knotted handkerchiefs on heads. It also shows George's wife Pattie Harrison and the many friends especially invited along by the Beatles - among them Mick Jagger, Marianne Faithfull, Keith Richard, Mike Nesmith, Donovan and Simon and Marijke of designers the Fool. [Marijke played a tambourine during the orchestral overdub which appeared on the final record.] It shows girl fans being ejected by Nell Aspinall and bubbles floating around the expanse of studio one. Tony Bramwell, an employee of Brian Epstein's NEMS company and in charge of the shooting, remembers the outcome. "It never got shown because the BBC banned the song, thinking it related to drugs. But the party idea was picked up again for the 'All You Need Is Love' broadcast."

Portions of the footage can be seen in the "A Day in the Life" promotional film, which includes shots of studio guests Mick Jagger, Marianne Faithfull, Keith Richards, Donovan, Pattie Boyd and Michael Nesmith.

https://backup.filesanywhere.com/v.asp?v=%8Aoj%86%5Fcp%AE%B2%9B

Following the final orchestral crescendo, the song ends with one of the most famous final chords in music history. The piano chord was a replacement for a failed vocal experiment. On the evening following the orchestra recording session, the four Beatles had originally recorded an ending of their voices humming the chord. After multiple overdubs they found that they wanted something with more impact.

Image

It took nine takes to perfect because the four players were rarely able to hit the keys at precisely the same time. Take seven was a good attempt, lasting longer than any other at 59 seconds. But it was take nine which was considered 'best' so it was overdubbed three more times, with George Martin compounding the sound further on a harmonium, until all four tracks of the tape were full. The resulting wall of sound, which lasted for 53.5 seconds (it was faded a little early on the record), was the perfect ending.

Geoff Emerick, up in the control room, once again had to ensure that every last droplet of sound from the studio was captured onto tape. To do this he used heavy compression and all the while was manually lifting the volume faders, which started close to their lowest point and gradually made their way to the maximum setting. "By the end the attenuation was enormous," says George Martin. "You could have heard a pin drop." Pins dropping there are not, but one can hear a rustle of paper and a chair squeaking. Interviewed in 1987, after the compact disc release of Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, Geoff Emerick noted, "Actually the sound could have gone on a bit longer but in those days the speakers weren't able to reproduce it. So we thought there wasn't any more sound but there was - the compact disc proves it.

Due to the multiple takes required to perfect the orchestral cacophony and the final chord, as well as their considerable procrastination in composing the song, the total duration of time spent recording "A Day in the Life" was 34 hours.

Immediately following the dying moments of the crashing piano chord is a tone too high-pitched for most human ears to hear, but audible to dogs and other animals. Lennon's alleged intention in inserting the high tone was to irritate the listener's dog.

The crashing piano chord and 15 kHz tone are interrupted by a loop of incomprehensible Beatles studio background noise. Spliced together at random sections would play forward to be heard as, "Never could be any other way" although played backward could be "Will Paul be back as Superman?" This lasts for two seconds and the final three syllables are on the final groove, creating a loop that is repeated endlessly. This noise was placed in the concentric run-out groove of the vinyl LP. If the listener's record player had an auto return mechanism, a short burst of noise would be heard before the needle was lifted and moved back into place. If the listener's record player had to be returned manually, the sound would loop infinitely, leading the listener to wonder if something had gone wrong with the record or the record player. Rumors of an obscene "hidden message", audible only when one played the vinyl copy backwards, abounded for many years without substantiation. This was mainly due to the practical difficulties involved with manually spooling the record backwards while maintaining a constant speed. McCartney denied intentionally putting a message in, saying, "If you look hard enough you can make something out of anything."

This coda to "A Day in the Life," and consequently the Sgt. Pepper's LP, was included in the original British pressings but not in American pressings. Although an infinite loop cannot be created on compact discs, the 1987 CD re-release recreates the effect by looping the noise eight or nine times before fading out.

George Martin (from Q Magazine, July 2007): "John's voice - which he hated - was the kind of thing that would send shivers down your spine. If you hear those opening chords with the guitar and piano, and then his voice comes in, 'I heard the news today, oh boy' It's just so evocative of that time. He always played his songs to me on the guitar and I would sit on a stool as he strummed. The orchestral section was Paul's idea. We put two pieces of songs together that weren't connected in any way. Then we had that 24-bars-of-nothing in between. I had to write a score, but in the climax, I gave each instrument different little waypoints at each bar, so they would know roughly where they should be when they were sliding up. Just so they didn't reach the climax too quickly. With A Day In The Life, I wondered whether we were losing our audience and I was scared. But I stopped being scared when I played it to the head of Capitol Records in America and he was gob smacked. He said, That's fantastic. And of course, it was."

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was officially released in both mono and stereo on June 1, 1967, although it was rush released in the UK on May 26. It was actually played on the radio in Britain on the BBC show Where It's At, the week before on May 20, except for A Day In The Life, which had been banned by the BBC the day earlier.

The cover of Sgt. Pepper's was designed by Peter Blake and put together by Peter Blake and Jann Haworth, who painstakingly combed through hundreds of photos for months before the photo shoot.

Image

The photo was taken by Michael Cooper at Chelsea Manor Photographic Studios on March 30, 1967.


Image

Original cover art


Image



Who’s Who on the Cover:

1. Sri Yukteswar Giri (guru)
2.Aleister Crowley (black magician)
3. Mae West
4. Lenny Bruce
5. Stockhausen (modern German composer)
6. W.C. Fields
7. Carl Jung (psychologist)
8. Edgar Allen Poe
9. Fred Astaire
10. Merkin (American artist)
12. Huntz Hall (Bowery Boy)
13. Simon Rodia (creater of Watts Towers)
14. Bob Dylan
15. Aubrey Beardsly (Victorian artist)
16. Sir Robert Peel (Police pioneer)
17. Aldous Huxley (philosopher)
18. Dylan Thomas (Welsh poet)
19. Terry Southern (author)
20. Dion (American pop singer)
21. Tony Curtis
22. Wallace Berman (Los Angeles artist)
23. Tommy Handley (wartime comedian)
24. Marilyn Monroe
25. William Buroughs (author)
27. Stan Laurel
28. Richard Lindner (New York artist)
29. Oliver Hardy
30. Karl Marx
31. H.G. Wells
33. Stuart Sutcliffe
35. Max Muller
37. Marlon Brando
38. Tom Mix (cowboy film star)
39. Oscar Wilde
40. Tyrone Power
41. Larry Bell (modern painter)
42. Dr. Livingstone
43. Johnny Weissmuller (Tarzan)
44. Stephen Crane (American writer)
45. Issy Bonn (comedian)
46. George Bernard Shaw
47. Albert Stubbins (Liverpool footballer)
49. Albert Einstein
50. Lewis Carol
51. Sonny Liston (boxer)
52 - 55. The Beatles (in wax)
57. Marlene Dietrich
58. Diana Dors
59. Shirley Temple
60. Bobby Breen (singing prodigy)
61. T.E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia)

List of objects:

Cloth grandmother-figure by Jann Haworth
A Mexican candlestick
A television set
A stone figure of a girl
Another stone figure
A statue brought over from John Lennon's house
A trophy
A doll of the Hindu goddess Lakshmi
A doll wearing a sweater giving homage to The Rolling Stones
A drum skin, designed by fairground artist Joe Ephgrave
A hookah
A velvet snake
Fukusuke, Japanese china figure
A stone figure of Snow White
A garden gnome
A tuba

People who were originally intended for the front cover but were ultimately excluded:


Jesus Christ (removed because the LP would be released a few months after John Lennon's Jesus statement)

Mahatma Gandhi (removed because EMI felt that his presence would offend the Indian market)

Judy Garland (removed because she requested fee for use of likeness)

Leo Gorcey (removed because he requested a fee for the use of his likeness)

Elvis Presley (removed at the last minute for unknown reasons)

Adolf Hitler (removed at the insistence of Parlophone Records)

In these pics from alternate shots of the cover photo, you can still see Leo Gorcey, who was removed because he requested a fee, next to his fellow Bowery Boy pal Huntz Hal, and Ghandi, who was removed because EMI felt his inclusion might offend record buyers in India.

Image

Image

In another Sgt. Pepper's related oddity, the official version of the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band LP made by EMI in South East Asia/Malaysia/Hong Kong was censored of three songs that apparently could have possibly been interpreted as being "drug related". The songs that were removed were With A Little Help From My Friends, Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds and A Day In The Life. They were replaced on the album with three songs from the Magical Mystery Tour album; The Fool On The Hill, Baby You're A Rich Man and I'm The Walrus.

In 1977, Korea issued its own strange version of Sgt. Pepper's the front cover having been removed of all of the famous people that graced the original cover. Like the Malaysian version, this release also was censored of Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds and A Day In The Life.

The Lyrics:

I read the news today, oh boy
About a lucky man who made the grade
And though the news was rather sad
Well, I just had to laugh
I saw the photograph

He blew his mind out in a car
He didn't notice that the lights had changed
A crowd of people stood and stared
They'd seen his face before
Nobody was really sure if he was from the House of Lords

I saw a film today, oh boy
The English army had just won the war
A crowd of people turned away
But I just had to look
Having read the book
I'd love to turn you on...

Orchestral buildup

Woke up, fell out of bed
Dragged a comb across my head
Found my way downstairs and drank a cup
And looking up I noticed I was late

Found my coat and grabbed my hat
Made the bus in second flat
Found my way upstairs and had a smoke
And somebody spoke and I went into a dream...

John sings "Ahhhh"

I read the news today, oh boy
Four thousand holes in Blackburn Lancashire
And though the holes were rather small
They had to count them all
Now they know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall
I'd love to turn you on...

Orchestral buildup
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
fansmom
Posts: 2059
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 4:50 pm
Location: Olney, Maryland

Status: Offline

Unread postby fansmom » Mon Apr 28, 2008 3:37 pm

So, did you sing the song to yourself as you read? Did you get to "I saw a film today . . ." and sing it as "I sawr a film today . . ." as Lennon sang it? Did you think of the "draw-ring" in yesterday's thread?

User avatar
teacher
Posts: 3395
Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 12:37 pm
Location: Macedonia

Status: Offline

Unread postby teacher » Mon Apr 28, 2008 5:14 pm

fansmom wrote:So, did you sing the song to yourself as you read? Did you get to "I saw a film today . . ." and sing it as "I sawr a film today . . ." as Lennon sang it? Did you think of the "draw-ring" in yesterday's thread?

Yep, and of Australiar, too. But I thought that's regular London speech, not Cockney. Isn't Cockney supposed to be about rhymes and word replacements? Like saying "bread" instead of "money", because money rhymes with "bread and honey" or... whatever. I was probably supposed to ask this in the other thread, though. :blush:
Strangely, I never liked Sgt. Pepper, but loved Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds - I only recenty learned what it was (probably) about. :hypnotic: The Beatles really got strange in the end.
Yes, I have tricks in my pocket, I have things up my sleeve. But I am the opposite of a stage magician. He gives you illusion that has the appearance of truth. I give you truth in the pleasant disguise of illusion. - Tom Wingfield, Glass Menagerie

User avatar
Inthezone
Posts: 2253
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 7:31 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Status: Offline

Unread postby Inthezone » Mon Apr 28, 2008 8:41 pm

teacher wrote:
fansmom wrote:So, did you sing the song to yourself as you read? Did you get to "I saw a film today . . ." and sing it as "I sawr a film today . . ." as Lennon sang it? Did you think of the "draw-ring" in yesterday's thread?

Yep, and of Australiar, too. But I thought that's regular London speech, not Cockney. Isn't Cockney supposed to be about rhymes and word replacements? Like saying "bread" instead of "money", because money rhymes with "bread and honey" or... whatever. I was probably supposed to ask this in the other thread, though. :blush:


The info regarding Sgt. Pepper was fascinating. I distinctly remember when my dad and uncle poring over the brand-new cover trying to identify the faces of people standing around the Beatles.

As far as the reference to "Cockney," I looked it up:
The speakers of which are traditionally "east enders" or working class (according to Oxford) they often slip into the cockney rhyming slang (i.e. slang inside of slang.) :-?
The dialect is generally characterized by the dropping of "h", substituting f and v, for t etc.
Apparently the rest of London use the Queen's english or speak in a "posh" manner.
"For certain you must be lost to find the place what can't be found. Elseways everyone would know where it was." ~ Hector Barbossa

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Apr 28, 2008 9:32 pm

fansmom, I actually do have the album but no needle on my turntable to play it. I did have it playing on my computer several times while I was working on the tidbit. And I did sing "sawr"!

teacher, we talked aobut the Cockney accent and word substitution in one of the threads during the Sweeney Todd discussion and it was precisely about the bread and money substitution as I recall. Does anyone else remember that? suec?

IntheZone, I remember trying to figure out all the faces on the album cover too. I'm glad someone did!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
Parlez
Posts: 2503
Joined: Thu Sep 21, 2006 9:30 am
Location: Colorado

Status: Offline

Unread postby Parlez » Mon Apr 28, 2008 10:48 pm

Well, the Boys and I go waaay back, so I remember every word ('sawr') and every story (Paul is dead) behind Sgt. Pepper. The album, along with a sweet note from George Martin are among my most treasured possessions.

Here's a bit of trivia to add: (Sir) George Martin (the 5th Beatle) founded AIR studios, which is located in a beautiful old church north of London in the town of Hampstead, where TB and HBC live. Johnny recorded the soundtrack for ST at AIR studios. As far as I know, George Martin is still alive and well and living in Hampstead also. His contribution to 'A Day in the Life' (and all the Beatles' recordings) is immeasurable, IMO.

Thanks for the tidbit - it was fab! :cool:
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa
savvy avi by mamabear

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:53 am

Parlez, if you go to the website below there are several interviews with and about George Martin and an in depth analysis of the recording of A Day in the Life. :cool:


http://www.applecorp.com/aditl/notes.htm
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
suec
Posts: 1381
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 1:57 pm
Location: uk

Status: Offline

Unread postby suec » Tue Apr 29, 2008 2:33 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:fansmom, I actually do have the album but no needle on my turntable to play it. I did have it playing on my computer several times while I was working on the tidbit. And I did sing "sawr"!

teacher, we talked aobut the Cockney accent and word substitution in one of the threads during the Sweeney Todd discussion and it was precisely about the bread and money substitution as I recall. Does anyone else remember that? suec?

IntheZone, I remember trying to figure out all the faces on the album cover too. I'm glad someone did!


Yes, I remember, DIDHOT. We did discuss the example quoted about bread and money. We also discussed, I think, the reasons for it. Cockney rhyming slang was originally a code to enable people to communicate without bystanders understanding the content. There are various theories for this. One being the need for dishonest folk to talk without the content being reported to the police. Another theory is that market stall holders developed it.
We probably discussed this too, but just in case:
Strictly speaking, the definition of a Cockney was someone born within earshot of Bow Bells. The church to which they belong is situated in the City of London - part of what is now central London. It wold have been the original, much smaller London in the past. Fleet Street is situated just a very short way to the west in the City. Sweeney would have heard them, as would Fred Abberline, in Whitechapel in the East End.
"Luck... inspiration... both only really happen to you when you empty your heart of ambition, purpose, and plan; when you give yourself, completely, to the golden, fate-filled moment."

User avatar
Liz
ONBC Moderator
Posts: 12971
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: The Left Coast

Status: Offline

Unread postby Liz » Tue Apr 29, 2008 9:14 pm

Wow! :-)

I have finally had a chance to catch up on tidbits. My days in the life have been interfering with my Zone time.

I never knew all of these things. I always thought it was an interesting piece and knew there were some stories behind it, but never took the time to find out what they were. I was only 12, after all, when it was released.

Thanks for showing the original artwork…..not to mention the rest of the story about the cover.

And thanks, Parlez, for pointing out the info on TB and HBC & the recording studio. :-O

Excellent tidbit, DITHOT! :applause:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Tue Apr 29, 2008 10:35 pm

Thanks, suec! I thought you might remember. :cool: I wasn't sure if it was Sweeney Todd or A Long Way Down but at least I remembered we discussed it! :lol:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
fansmom
Posts: 2059
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 4:50 pm
Location: Olney, Maryland

Status: Offline

Unread postby fansmom » Thu May 01, 2008 2:10 pm

Today (May 1st) is the birthday of #19, Terry Southern. (Who's he?)

'It's the birthday of screenwriter and novelist Terry Southern, (books by this author) born in Alvarado, Texas (1924). His first novel, Flash and Filigree, came out in 1958. His second, The Magic Christian (1960), was not a popular success, but it did earn him the admiration of Stanley Kubrick, who invited him to collaborate on the screenplay for Doctor Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, which appeared in (1963). Life magazine called it "a film so original, irreverent and appalling that it practically divided the nation into two enemy camps." And film critic Robert Sklar said was one of the most important films of the 1960s because "it satirized the cold-war mentality and helped lay the groundwork for the 1960s counterculture." It was nominated for an Academy Award, as was another of Southern's screenplays, Easy Rider (1969).

'His photo appeared in the collage on the cover of the Beatles' album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. He said, "The important thing in writing is the capacity to astonish. Not shock—shock is a worn-out word—but astonish. The world has no grounds whatever for complacency."'

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Thu May 01, 2008 2:42 pm

fansmom, I never realized Terry was one of the people behind one of my favorite movies, Dr. Strangelove or that he was a fellow Texan! I know there is a Johnny connection with Terry as well. The only one that comes to my mind has to do with the movie The Source about the Beats. I think there may be something else I'm not remembering though.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!


Return to “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests